Human technopole Milan

Highlights

  • Human Technopole announces new President and Supervisory Board

    Milan, 13 July 2022 – The Presidency of the Council of Ministers by means of a Decree signed on 7 July 2022 has appointed Professor Gianmario Verona, rector of Bocconi University in Milan, as the new President of the Supervisory Board of the Human Technopole Foundation. In its new composition, the Foundation’s Supervisory Board includes […]

    Read more
  • Human Technopole Studies Neurological and Psychiatric Effects of Covid-19

    The international research project ‘NEUROCOV’ on the long-term neurological and psychiatric effects of COVID-19 has kicked off. The five-year EU-funded project was developed by Human Technopole and the German Centre for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and involves ten institutes from seven countries. Human Technopole, which will receive EUR 3.2 Million European Commission funding, will be engaged […]

    Read more
  • HT Course – BrainOmics

    Location: Human Technopole, Milan, Italy

    Date: Nov 28 – Dec 2, 2022

    Target audience: 20 participants selected through application

    Registrations closes: 30 September 2022

    Registration fee: 650 €

    Read more

Research at HT

Improving human health and well-being is the ultimate goal of Human Technopole. We need to prevent and cure diseases to allow people of all ages to not only live longer, but also live better.

Discover more about our:

Thanks to a global and interdisciplinary study of human biology, our research is aimed at understanding the mechanisms at the basis of various diseases, leveraging the technological advances of the last decade and the enormous amount of biological, clinical and socio-economic data currently available to improve our healthcare systems and our overall quality of life.

Human Technopole’s research is based on five interdisciplinary research centres: Genomics, Neurogenomics, Structural Biology, Computational Biology and Health Data Science. Research activity is supported by six state-of-the-art facilities.

Work with us

We offer the opportunity to be part of a new, dynamic research institute promoting a highly collaborative and international working environment.

We aim to attract the best resources in each field with a selection based on merit and transparency as we believe that highly diverse teams produce the best and most innovative results.

If you are a passionate person who likes to seize great challenges, consider applying for one of our scientific or administrative vacancies. 

Latest news

To keep up to date with Human Technopole’s development and the activities of the institute, sign up to our newsletter. The HT newsletter is sent every three months or so to share what is happening at HT: news, events, scientific and dissemination initiatives, job and training opportunities and much more.
  • Human Technopole Studies Neurological and Psychiatric Effects of Covid-19

    The international research project ‘NEUROCOV’ on the long-term neurological and psychiatric effects of COVID-19 has kicked off. The five-year EU-funded project was developed by Human Technopole and the German Centre for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and involves ten institutes from seven countries. Human Technopole, which will receive EUR 3.2 Million European Commission funding, will be engaged […]

    Read more
  • Human stem cells recapitulate early embryonic development in vitro

    Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) has successfully been used to study tissue and organ development in vitro. Eleonora Conti and Oliver Harschnitz review the pros and cons of using human PSCs to investigate the development of placodes – embryonic structures giving rise to diverse organs – during the early steps of human embryonic development […]

    Read more
  • Derailing molecular cargo trains in cilia makes them turn around

    Researchers at the Human Technopole and Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics show how molecular cargo trains change direction in cellular micro-antennas. Cilia are antenna-like structures that protrude outwards from the surface of eukaryotic cells. Misassembled cilia in humans can cause numerous diseases from infertility to lung malfunction. The assembly and maintenance […]

    Read more
  • Cilia trains

    Cilia in 3D: Miniature train station discovered

    Cilia are hair-like organelles that extend from most eukaryotic cells and perform many functions, including motility and signaling. Together with collaborators at the University of Geneva (Hamel-Guichard lab) and Biozentrum, University of Basel (Engel Lab), Dr. Gaia Pigino’s Group at the Human Technopole in Milan has now revealed that cilia have a specialised transport hub […]

    Read more
  • New tools for the analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 screens

    Supervised classification methods can be used for the analysis of genetic screens obtained through the CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology. Nevertheless, these methods require large sets of reference genes to be included among those targeted with CRISPR. Alessandro Vinceti, of the Iorio Group, presents a novel computational method to identify reference gene sets of minimal size […]

    Read more
  • Francesca Ieva on Lombardy Region Taskforce

    Our Associate Head of the Health Data Science Centre has been appointed to a new task force created by Lombardy Region which aims to reduce waiting lists and verify the proper management in the provision of health services to citizens. The task force includes members from Lombardy Region Welfare General Management, ATS, ASST, Lombardy Health […]

    Read more
  • HT at the 23rd International Exhibition of Triennale Milano

    The works on display at the 23rd International Exhibition, “Unknown Unknowns. An Introduction to Mysteries”, also include two microscopy images created by Human Technopole researchers. The unknown, the mysterious, what we “know we don’t know”. This is the theme at the heart of the exhibition, curated by Ersilia Vaudo, astrophysicist and Chief Diversity Officer of […]

    Read more
  • Mapping spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks in neural cells

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause mutations and genomic rearrangements resulting in genome instability thus contributing to the onset of genetic disorders and cancer. Magda Bienko and Nicola Crosetto provide tools and resources to investigate spontaneous DSBs that arise in an in vitro model of neurodevelopmental disorder pathogenesis. DNA damage can be either induced by […]

    Read more